Rubrics for Assessing Online Asynchronous and Synchronous Learning

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Rubrics for Assessing Online Asynchronous and Synchronous Learning

Rubrics may be holistic or analytic. Holistic rubrics make use of one single criterion for marking while analytic ones provide several criteria and rate each criterion. Below are samples of rubrics for assessing different types of asynchronous and synchronous learning such as discussion posts and research presentations. Rubrics for marking essays and capstone projects are also discussed. These samples may be modified so that they can be used for other disciplines and other forms of assessment. This means that a rubric intended for an oral presentation may be modified for an in-person thesis defense; a rubric for an online post may be used with some modification to assess written work.  

Take a look at the following samples below.

ASYNCHRONOUS DISCUSSION POSTS 

(Source : Discussion Rubrics)

DISCUSSION rubric 

An analytic 10 point scale rubric for assessing asynchronous discussions with one specific criterion based on the student’s “contribution to the learning community”.  Considered as a best feature this criterion among others is a useful measure for evaluating the student’s ability to engage the cohort.

Online DISCUSSION BOARD Rubric

Is your post “provocative”, “substantial” or “superficial”? A holistic rubric with a uniquely descriptive scale. Removing the graded points transforms this rubric into a useful formative assessment tool.

DISCUSSION rubric

The criteria for an online discussion post of this 100-point analytic rubric includes the student’s quality of prose, engagement with the cohort and reference to citations and examples. Definitely useful when marking major discussions including synchronous and asynchronous debates! When modified, the rubric may be used for assessing essays as well. 

DISCUSSION BOARD Grading Rubric

This non scoring (no points assigned) rubric provides two key criteria out of five for assessing “critical thinking” and “response to others”. Critical thinking is assessed in terms of the depth and uniqueness of the student’s insight as well as his/her ability to evaluate and synthesize ideas. As a non scoring rubric, it presents a useful formative assessment tool for connecting to the student’s context.   

Purdue Repository for Online Teaching and Learning  Sample DISCUSSION BOARD Rubric

This “multipurpose” rubric may be used for both graded and non graded assessments (by removing the points).Because one of the criteria measures the “quantity of discussion responses”, this rubric may be appropriately used for formatively assessing interactive whiteboard posts. As a bonus, the site provides an online discussion netiquette and guidelines to writing “crisp” discussion posts: considerate, reflective, interactive, succinct and pertinent. View more resources at  PoRTAL: Purdue Repository for online Teaching and Learning.

Scoring Rubric for RESEARCH PRESENTATIONS 

This 100-point analytic rubric for assessing online research presentation is divided into the following criteria: organization, content, delivery and response to questions. Scoring for each criterion is detailed and specific. While the rubric provides a measure for assessing “delivery” which captures the requirements of an online class, the criteria may also be applied for assessing an in-person presentation. More information from RECAP Writing Rubric – RECAP : REsearch, Creative Activity and Performance.

ORAL PRESENTATION Rubric

This oral presentation rubric combines the criteria based on delivery and content.  In addition, the rubric also provides for a measure for “audience understanding” of the topic being presented. Scoring scale may be modified to suit specific needs.

ORAL PRESENTATION Rubric

In addition to the typical elements for marking presentations (delivery, organization and content), this rubric provides a scheme for creativity, which is defined in terms of the student’s original contribution to the presentation.  View more rubrics on creativity at RubricsOral Report Evaluation Rubric  and Oral Presentations.

Oral Exams Rubric 

Philosophy, Theology, Law and Politics and other disciplines that use the oral exam as a test for desired learning outcomes. Find some interesting examples of oral exam rubrics from the CMU’s Eberly Center.

Rubric for MARKING AN ESSAY 

What is an “A” essay? How does it score differently from a “high B” essay? Refer to the rubric for marking an essay based on the sample criteria on thesis and motive, evidence and analysis, structure, style and revision. For additional information refer to CMU’s Eberly Center learning site. 

Rubric for a CAPSTONE PROJECT 

The rubric provides a marking scheme for assessing each stage of a group project namely the definition (teambuilding) discovery (data gathering), construct (connection to research) stages.  Other phases into the project life in which the group “refines” and “reflects” about their material and the process behind the project building are included in the matrix. Best features include the above aspects and  scheme for peer evaluation. A multipurpose rubric, this sample is relevant for marking a project and for assessing group dynamics. Information at the  CMU’s Eberly Center learning site. 

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